The best of 2013, so far

We’ve somehow already reached the halfway point of the calendar year. Since Halloween decorations will be out before you know it, we thought it would be a good idea to look back at our most popular posts from the first six months of the year, just in case you missed something. Have something in mind you want to read about during the second half of the year? Want to contribute? Please let us know.

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Cloud Adoption for Enhanced Business Stability

by Satish Irrinki (Red Hat)

Increasingly in today’s world, data centers are moving towards software-defined computing, networking, and storage. IT infrastructure that supports the application and data workloads is moving from bare metal servers to cloud. While the most obvious justification for this shift can be summarized as increased efficiency, capacity utilization, and flexibility (to scale up or down), there are less obvious fundamental economic and financial principles in play that contribute to overall business stability of the organizations and lines of business (LOB).

Cloud computing has changed the cost structure of IT infrastructure. Historically, IT infrastructure was considered a capital expenditure (CapEx) that requires large upfront investments leading to higher fixed costs for the business. With the advent of cloud computing, primarily because of its pay-for-use billing model, IT expenditure shifted from fixed operating cost structure to variable operating cost (OpEx) model.

This shift not only decreases the need for larger cash flow requirements or, in lieu, higher liabilities on balance sheet (akin to capitalization of lease expenses) for the CapEx, it also reduces the volatility in the operating income for the business.

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Red Hat Training and certifications help build your path to the cloud

by Randy Russell and Pete Hnath (Red Hat)

Cloud computing represents a major shift in enterprise IT architecture that requires companies to rethink their strategy. Red Hat is bringing to market a full portfolio of training and certification offerings that enable customers to evaluate Red Hat’s cloud technologies and understand how to deploy them successfully.

Customers seeking to build an open Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud may look to Red Hat OpenStack as their foundation. OpenStack is emerging as a leading platform for IaaS cloud architectures and has attained broad industry support. Red Hat is excited to announce the immediate availability of Red Hat OpenStack Administration (CL210), which provides architects and system administrators with a hands-on course to learn how to install, configure, and manage a Red Hat OpenStack deployment. Later this summer Red Hat will also introduce the Red Hat certificate of expertise in OpenStack IaaS, which will validate a professional’s ability to successfully deploy and administrate an OpenStack based IaaS cloud.

For customers looking to deliver an open Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) cloud, OpenShift Enterprise by Red Hat may be the solution. OpenShift gives application developers self-service access so they can easily deploy applications on demand. Red Hat is pleased to announce the immediate availability of OpenShift Enterprise Administration (CL280), a heavily lab-based 2-day course that guides the student through the steps to install, configure and manage an OpenShift based PaaS cloud.

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Using the command-line interface of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.1

by Rob Locke (Red Hat)

One of the new features introduced in version 3.1 of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization is a command line interface (CLI) to connect to the manager. The CLI also contains a scripting system, which helps system administrators perform periodic maintenance or repetitive tasks on their virtualization environment.

Communication with the RHEV Manager is secured through the use of a certificate that needs to be downloaded from the manager:

$ wget http://rhevm.pod0.example.com/ca.crt

Connect to the RHEV Manager using the rhevm-shell command (referring to the downloaded certificate):

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Five top tips for the journey to cloud

by Malcolm Herbert (Red Hat)

The post below originally appeared here on November 22, 2012.

A comparison between enterprise IT and public cloud computing dramatically highlights the benefits of moving to cloud.

Application deployment times can shrink from weeks in the traditional data centre to minutes in a cloud data centre; new application development time accelerates from years to weeks (or months at most); cost per virtual machine plummets from dollars to cents; server administrator ratios can explode from 20:1 to 300:1; while efficiency increases, with resource utilisation soaring from 20% to 75%.

With measurable benefits like these, it’s no wonder that IDC expects that by 2015 the majority of the enterprise market will require integrated hybrid cloud management capabilities (Source: IDC Cloud Management Study, 2011 Survey).

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The evolution of operational efficiency

by Larry Spangler (Red Hat)

Lately, I’ve been seeing and hearing a lot of buzz about “operational efficiency.” As some see it, Operational Efficiency is basically the idea of doing more with less–if you can define and follow processes you can achieve repeatable outcomes with reduced error. Automate that, and you have a means to extend the reach of the individual IT operator while decreasing the effort and time required to build systems. It’s a straightforward value proposition that Red Hat has been touting and delivering for years with standardized operating environments (SOEs) and management tools like Red Hat Network Satellite and JBoss Operations Network.

But there’s evolution afoot here from the classic “operational” sense to one that is more expansive and higher purposed. The basics of SOE and management tools are now being used not only to define and develop repeatable infrastructure, they’re being leveraged with other tools like virtualization, IaaS, and PaaS to deliver on-demand capabilities. The key being that the focus is shifting from how to get the most out of your resource investment, to how to effectively and efficiently instantiate, use, and release systems for true on-demand capabilities.

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BPM: Utilizing JBoss technologies to increase business performance and agility

by Duncan Doyle

With the growing popularity of cloud environments and cloud-like architectures, the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) paradigm has become increasingly important. Having been the previous big buzzword in IT, the term SOA has often been used as a means to sell software products instead of a term to refer to architectural style. However, in order to benefit most from the new possibilities in virtualization, just-in-time provisioning and on-demand scalability it has become a must for businesses to partition their enterprise logic and functionality into individual components which can independently be deployed in heterogeneous environments.

One of the goals of an SOA is to provide the enterprise with a set of re-usable, readily available business services, and as such reduce cost and provide greater operational agility. The autonomous nature of well-defined services make these components the perfect candidate for deployment in cloud environments. These individual services can then be combined, or composed into business applications which provide the actual business value. The specific compositions of these services in fact defines the actual business process.

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Guest Post: Bruno Lima, Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year, EMEA

by Bruno Lima

Becoming EMEA’s Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year was very easy. I just wrote a letter and crossed my fingers, haha. Jokes aside, I believe I became a Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year because when I entered my submission, I not only wrote a reply, I relayed how Red Hat is integral to both the story of my life and in my career. From the innovative projects I’ve participated in to the satisfaction of our customers, Red Hat has meant a lot to me.

I started using Red Hat technologies in the mid-90s when open source was still unknown by many and ignored by almost everyone. I remember my first installation of Red Hat, which was at a public company in a small town called Sao Luis in Brazil. It was where I was born and raised. The company needed a reliable solution to run an electronic mail system, and at that moment the only platform that met our needs was to use the Red Hat Linux with Sendmail. I never stopped using Red Hat technologies after that, using Red Hat and open source for more and more projects.

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