GUEST POST: Software and configuration management made easy with RPM

by Christian Stankowic

If you’re maintaining multiple Red Hat Enterprise Linux systems (or equivalent offsets like CentOS or Scientific Linux) your administration work with the particular hosts will gain in a routine. Because even the best administrator might forget something it would be advantageously to have a central software and configuration management solution. Chef and Puppet are two very mighty and popular mangement tools for this application. Depending on your system landscape and needs these tools might also be oversized though – Red Hat Package Manager (RPM) can emerge as a functional alternative in this case.

It is often forgotten that RPM can be used for sharing own software and configurations as well. If you’re not managing huge system landscapes with uncontrolled growth of software and want to have a easy-to-use solution, you might want to have a look at RPM.

I’m myself using RPM to maintain my whole Red Hat Enterprise Linux system landscape – this article will show you how easy RPM can be used to simplify system management.

Continue reading “GUEST POST: Software and configuration management made easy with RPM”

The best of 2013, so far

We’ve somehow already reached the halfway point of the calendar year. Since Halloween decorations will be out before you know it, we thought it would be a good idea to look back at our most popular posts from the first six months of the year, just in case you missed something. Have something in mind you want to read about during the second half of the year? Want to contribute? Please let us know.

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Mounting a Volume Using the Native Client when a Server is Down

by Wander Boessenkool (Red Hat)

Replicated Red Hat Storage Server Volumes provide you with high-availability, when a single server goes down all your data is still there. Even better, if you were using that server to access your data using the native client it will automatically switch over to a server that is still responding. But what if you want to mount the volume while the server you normally use is down?

When you want to mount a Red Hat Storage Server Volume from your /etc/fstab you normally use a line like this:

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Tips and Tricks: JBoss Enterprise Application Development (JB225)

by Jim Rigsbee (Red Hat)

Converting a web project generated by the JBoss Developer Studio CDI Web Project wizard to a Maven project will give you the power of the Maven build system with its dependency management, build life cycles, and automated JEE packaging abilities. To covert a JBoss Developer Studio web project, follow these steps:

1. Right click on the project name in the Project Explorer tree and select Configure → Convert to Maven Project… In the wizard steps be sure to select WAR packaging.

2. Configure the Java SE 6 compiler plugin so that we can process annotations. Add this to pom.xml file:

<build>
  <plugins>
    <plugin>
      <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
        <configuration>
          <source>1.6</source>
            <target>1.6</target>
      </configuration>
    </plugin>
  </plugins>
</build>

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Red Hat Fuse Demonstration with videos

by Kenny Peeples (Red Hat)

The post below originally appeared here on March 14, 2013.

On March 12, 2013, Red Hat announced the addition of Red Hat Fuse and JBoss A-MQ to its enterprise middleware portfolio, which are based on Apache Camel and Active MQ. The announcement is here.

Additional information including software downloads are located at http://www.jboss.org/jbossfuse and http://www.jboss.org/jbossamq

I am updating the videos for better sound and content but here is the first preview of the Fuse WebSocket HTML 5 demo.

The videos will help you build your first application in Fuse.

Video Part 1: Part 1 Getting Started
Video Part 2: Part 2 Getting Started
Video Part 3: Part 3 Getting Started

Source Code located on github at: https://github.com/kpeeples/jboss-fuse-websockets-demo-1.git

Tips & Tricks: JB348 Application Administration II

by Bruce Wolfe (Red Hat)

Furtureproof Installation

When planning your installation of JBoss EAP 6, you have three choices; ZIP, JAR or RPM. The JAR based installer is, arguably, the best and most flexible option because it will generate an answer file that can be used for silent, repeatable installs; great if you have to install JBoss on multiple servers (e.g. clustering). Using the answer file, repeat the install with:

$ java -jar jboss-eap-installer-<version>.jar <answer_file>.xml

Continue reading “Tips & Tricks: JB348 Application Administration II”

How to convert a JBoss Developer Studio web project to a Maven project (JB225)

by Jim Rigsbee (Red Hat)

In this article, we will convert a web project generated by the JBoss Developer Studio CDI Web Project wizard to a Maven project. Doing so will give you the power of the Maven build system with its dependency management, build life cycles, and automated JEE packaging abilities. Follow these steps:

a. Right click on the project name in the Project Explorer tree and select Configure → Convert to Maven Project… In the wizard steps be sure to select WAR packaging.

Continue reading “How to convert a JBoss Developer Studio web project to a Maven project (JB225)”

Cloud Sniff Test: Cutting through the jargon

by David Kang (Red Hat)

Cloud is not software, cloud is not hardware, cloud is not virtualization, and cloud is certainly not a panacea for broken IT. Cloud is an architecture: a set of fundamental tenets that have different implications at different levels of IT, from network, to hardware, to applications, and to the IT process itself. To say you have a cloud is to say that you have a cohesive architecture, technology set, and most importantly processes, that work towards a defined goal under a set of well-understood principals. Building your cloud is as much about defining your goals and governing principals as it is about investing in technology.

Building your cloud and consuming cloud services
Step one is defining your governing principals. This is a crucial step before embarking on your cloud journey as the policies and principals you define will help you navigate your journey through the rapidly expanding cloud ecosystem. This is also an opportunity to ask tough questions and examine what your principals and processes are, and why you have them. Process is ultimately about managing risk, so consider what risks are acceptable under your governance policies and weigh them against the potential benefits cloud can offer. Both Facebook and Google have adopted “deploy to production” models that seem to fly in the face of process conventions such as ITIL or RUP, yet somehow they seem to survive. The penalty for not doing this exercise is ballooning adoption costs, or failed rollouts all together.

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