Process Insights with Red Hat Process Automation Manager and Kibana

Red Hat® Process Automation Manager is a platform for developing containerized microservices and applications that automate business decisions and processes. A critical piece of a business process system is having real-time insights into what is happening, and both monitoring KPI metrics and responding to problem trends is an integral part of operations.

In this video, we will take a look at how we can enable integration with Elasticsearch on a Red Hat® OpenShift environment, and how to represent the KPIs in a graphical business-friendly dashboard using Kibana.

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Red Hat provides free learning opportunities

In these times of great disruption and uncertainty, Red Hat is steadfast in our commitment to providing accessible open source learning to those whose lives have been most affected. Due to COVID-19, many students and workers across the world are currently staying at home to prioritize our collective health and safety. Jobs have been impacted. Students are adapting to changed learning environments. During this time, we have an opportunity to invest in ourselves, build new skills, and prepare ourselves and our communities to emerge stronger. 

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Application monitoring in OpenShift 4.3

As enterprises start to adopt their container journey and onboard their applications into the OpenShift Container Platform, application monitoring becomes critical to anticipate problems and discover bottlenecks in a production environment. Application Monitoring is also one of the biggest challenges faced by almost all organizations who are either in the process of or already have migrated their workloads into OpenShift.

The growing adoption of microservices architecture makes monitoring more complex since a large number of applications that are distributed in nature are communicating with each other. What used to be a function or a direct call in a monolithic application is now a network call from one microservice to another. Also, running multiple instances on these microservices as containers adds another layer of complexity.

Starting with OpenShift 4.3, you can use the platform’s monitoring capabilities for your application workloads running on OpenShift. This helps keep the application monitoring centralized. You don’t need to manage an additional monitoring solution as the platform now provides these capabilities.

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Enterprise integration solution implementation made easy using Red Hat Integration

Enterprises have various options to implement integration solutions. Some of them can be purchased as a pre-built product ready for installation or procured from an Integration Platform as a Service (PaaS). In contrast, others can be built from scratch if there are enough resources and funding available along with a desire to reinvent the wheel.  Most of these products have both pros and cons. In this blog post, I discuss open-source ways to design and develop enterprise integration solutions using integration technologies from Red Hat.

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Hands on introduction to OpenShift Serverless

I recently collaborated with fellow Red Hatters to create a whiteboarding video that introduces OpenShift Serverless at a high level. In this article, I build upon that YouTube video and my recent work with Quarkus to create a hands-on deep dive into OpenShift Serverless. This article walks you through using the OpenShift Serverless operator to seamlessly add serverless capabilities to an OpenShift 4.3 cluster and then using the Knative CLI tool to deploy a Quarkus native application as a serverless service onto that same cluster.

OpenShift Serverless

OpenShift Serverless helps developers to deploy and run applications that will scale up or scale to zero on-demand. Applications are packaged as OCI compliant Linux containers that can be run anywhere. Using the Serverless model, an application can simply consume compute resources and automatically scale up or down based on use. As mentioned in the introduction above, the whiteboarding YouTube video embedded below provides a high-level overview of OpenShift Serverless.

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Native Supersonic Subatomic Applications with Quarkus