Top 10 posts of 2013

by Mike Randall (Red Hat)

As we gear up for the coming year, it would be criminal for us to not to do our very own Top 10 list while we say good night to 2013. Miss something over the last 12 months? Here are our most popular posts from 2013, in their glorious and original form:

Tuning your system with tuned, Wander Boessenkool

Announcing the Red Hat Certificate of Expertise in Server Hardening, Randy Russell

Red Hat announces new OpenStack certification, Iain Gray

Guest post: Journey to RHCE and beyond, Christian Stankowic

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WEBINAR: Simplify large-scale, middleware migrations with JBoss Windup

Migrating to open source software can be challenging. JBoss® Windup, a Community project, makes the transition easier. Learn how to use JBoss Windup to reduce the time, cost, and risk of migrations of proprietary Java™ EE investments to open source middleware.

In this session, Windup’s creator, Brad Davis, will give a live demonstration of JBoss Windup and discuss using the project to assist with migrations from Oracle WebLogic and IBM WebSphere to Red Hat® JBoss Enterprise Application Platform.

In this webinar, you will learn about:
• Migration planning tools.
• How Windup can be used throughout the IT migration process.
• Windup’s capabilities within Java EE migrations.
• Techniques for making large-scale Java platform migrations successful.
• Windup’s feature roadmap.

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Java enterprise application migration: The four pillars of success

by Brad Davis (Red Hat)

With the release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 6, Red Hat successfully delivered a full JEE 6-compliant container that is both lightweight and enterprise ready. As a result, many IT leaders are actively looking to shift their application workloads away from proprietary technologies like Websphere and Weblogic to JBoss EAP.

But questions about cost, risk and starting point often stand in the way.

In response, Red Hat Consulting has developed a proven methodology, identifying four key pillars to a successful migration. Leveraging Planning, Participation, Communication, and Follow through, more and more customers are easily migrating from legacy platforms to JBoss EAP.

The Planning pillar analyzes an organization’s proprietary applications and processes. This stage elicits an understanding of the application environment, as Red Hat’s JBoss Windup tooling quickly scans applications to find and estimate migration effort for each application. Data from the Windup report allows us to group applications together and to plan for optimized parallel or repeatable migrations where appropriate. Those critical to the migration’s success from a business, development and operational standpoint are also consulted to best understand the skill sets, procedures, and timelines needed to support development, architecture, deployment, maintenance and monitoring tasks.

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The best of 2013, so far

We’ve somehow already reached the halfway point of the calendar year. Since Halloween decorations will be out before you know it, we thought it would be a good idea to look back at our most popular posts from the first six months of the year, just in case you missed something. Have something in mind you want to read about during the second half of the year? Want to contribute? Please let us know.

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Determining your ‘migration mission statement’…and why it’s important

by Thomas Crowe (Red Hat)

A key component to a successful migration is a “migration mission statement.” The migration mission statement’s purpose is to summarize the key parts of a migration into a succinct, simply-communicated format that results in a clearly defined migration goal that is easily measurable for success. A sample migration mission statement could be:

Migrate the Acme Order Processing java application from the current proprietary IBM hardware running AIX and WebSphere into a cloud infrastructure running Red Hat Enterprise Linux and JBoss Application Server; in order to provide better TCO and ROI, as well as provide increased scalability and reliability. The migration should be performed during non-peak hours, have minimal downtime requirements, and provide for rollback if necessary.

Generally speaking, there are several factors that go into planning and executing a successful migration project. But by answering the following questions, a significant amount of the information necessary for a successful migration can be gathered.

What?
The most basic question to initially ask is simply, “What is being migrated?” This simple question sets the stage for gathering the additional information that is required. Is the migration moving all services from one server to another? Maybe it is migrating an application from one application server to another, or migrating storage from one array to another. Each of these scenarios are going to have unique data-gathering requirements that need to be understood in order to successfully plan and ultimately execute a successful migration.

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Migration planning using JBoss Cake

by Emily Brand (Red Hat)

Starting research on how to migrate your applications to JBoss can be an overwhelming process. Taking the migration in small steps will help manage expectations and increase the success of the effort. The major steps for planning include creating a project management office, completing a current state analysis, and creating a diagram specifying how applications interface with each other throughout your organization. With that information in hand you are ready to create a project plan and begin the migration.

Create a Project Management Office (PMO)
Decide which project managers will be the overall leads of the project. If you are missing resources that are capable of project managing, Red Hat Consulting can help augment your PMO and train your project managers for migrations.

The PMO will handle scheduling by creating a project plan. The project plan should originally be a high level document specifying the list of applications and the project start and end date. Managing and mitigating risks is the number one goal of the project manager. The PMO will also be in charge of holding individuals accountable for sticking to the project plan after achieving buy-in as well as coordinating communication throughout all of the necessary parties including infrastructure, database, and application teams.

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Migration strategy 2.0: Plan a services-focused approach for greatest success

by Thomas Crowe (Red Hat)

As an experienced IT professional, chances are you’ve been involved with a migration of some sort. Whether it’s a simple migration, such as moving static data to another node or a highly complex migration across datacenters, all successful migrations have one thing in common – rock solid planning. Migrations that are attempted without the requisite planning can be fraught with peril, and end up with disastrous consequences

Ultimately, users, our customers, do not really care if a given server is up or down. They care whether they can access a specific application, such as email, a web site, or data. It is the service that users care about, and it is the service in which migration planning needs to be focused.

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Business value of open source software

by Satish Irrinki (Red Hat)

It’s a truism that adopting open source software (OSS) reduces costs, but that’s not all. Let’s make a deeper dive into the business value of adopting OSS and uncover how the adoption provides immense value at multiple levels of an organization. The value proposition for OSS can be attributed to three groups within an organization – Technical Buyers, Business Buyers, and Economic Buyers.

Technical Buyers
Technical buyers can be best described as the line managers who are operating under stringent budgets to do more with fewer resources. As a result they aim to reduce costs and increase efficiencies within their operating units. In a bid to increase their resources utilizations, the technical buyers seek to increase reliability and flexibility in their operations. To achieve these goals they use systems that are reliable, adhere to standard specifications, and low in cost.

The high level of collaboration and contribution within the OSS development model accelerates the number of features that typical open source software provides. Availability of source code allows the adopters to make custom changes and tailor the software for specific needs. The ability to reuse software components across the organization (develop once and use within multiple systems) reduces the unit cost of development. These virtues of OSS mesh well with the goals of technical buyers and make OSS a viable option when making technology decisions.

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