Enforcing Authentication and Authorization on a JAX-WS web service using Picketlink

by Kenny Peeples (Red Hat)

Introduction

The following article describes how to enforce authentication with SAML and authorization with XACML on a JAX-WS Web Service on JBoss Enterprise Application Platform with Picketlink. I combined several articles listed in the References section to make this one demonstration. The source code is on github.

Products
JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 5.2.0
Picketlink 2.0.1
JDK 1.7
JBoss Developer Studio 6

Note: Future updates will the latest versions of EAP/Picketlink/Fuse and moving the projects to maven.

Server Project
Contains the Web Service to take the assertion out of the wsse, validate it, verify authorization and process the request. The files contained in the project are the SAML2ServerHandler.java, WSTest.java, WSTestBean.java, jboss.xml, jbossxacml-config.xml,standard-jaxws-endpoint-config.xml,xacml-policy.xml,sts-config.properties,sts-roles.properties,sts-security-domain-jboss-beans.xml,sts-users.properties. All the XML is displayed to the console.

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Red Hat Fuse Demonstration with videos

by Kenny Peeples (Red Hat)

The post below originally appeared here on March 14, 2013.

On March 12, 2013, Red Hat announced the addition of Red Hat Fuse and JBoss A-MQ to its enterprise middleware portfolio, which are based on Apache Camel and Active MQ. The announcement is here.

Additional information including software downloads are located at http://www.jboss.org/jbossfuse and http://www.jboss.org/jbossamq

I am updating the videos for better sound and content but here is the first preview of the Fuse WebSocket HTML 5 demo.

The videos will help you build your first application in Fuse.

Video Part 1: Part 1 Getting Started
Video Part 2: Part 2 Getting Started
Video Part 3: Part 3 Getting Started

Source Code located on github at: https://github.com/kpeeples/jboss-fuse-websockets-demo-1.git

Migration planning using JBoss Cake

by Emily Brand (Red Hat)

Starting research on how to migrate your applications to JBoss can be an overwhelming process. Taking the migration in small steps will help manage expectations and increase the success of the effort. The major steps for planning include creating a project management office, completing a current state analysis, and creating a diagram specifying how applications interface with each other throughout your organization. With that information in hand you are ready to create a project plan and begin the migration.

Create a Project Management Office (PMO)
Decide which project managers will be the overall leads of the project. If you are missing resources that are capable of project managing, Red Hat Consulting can help augment your PMO and train your project managers for migrations.

The PMO will handle scheduling by creating a project plan. The project plan should originally be a high level document specifying the list of applications and the project start and end date. Managing and mitigating risks is the number one goal of the project manager. The PMO will also be in charge of holding individuals accountable for sticking to the project plan after achieving buy-in as well as coordinating communication throughout all of the necessary parties including infrastructure, database, and application teams.

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Tips & Tricks: JB348 Application Administration II

by Bruce Wolfe (Red Hat)

Furtureproof Installation

When planning your installation of JBoss EAP 6, you have three choices; ZIP, JAR or RPM. The JAR based installer is, arguably, the best and most flexible option because it will generate an answer file that can be used for silent, repeatable installs; great if you have to install JBoss on multiple servers (e.g. clustering). Using the answer file, repeat the install with:

$ java -jar jboss-eap-installer-<version>.jar <answer_file>.xml

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How to convert a JBoss Developer Studio web project to a Maven project (JB225)

by Jim Rigsbee (Red Hat)

In this article, we will convert a web project generated by the JBoss Developer Studio CDI Web Project wizard to a Maven project. Doing so will give you the power of the Maven build system with its dependency management, build life cycles, and automated JEE packaging abilities. Follow these steps:

a. Right click on the project name in the Project Explorer tree and select Configure → Convert to Maven Project… In the wizard steps be sure to select WAR packaging.

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BPM: Utilizing JBoss technologies to increase business performance and agility

by Duncan Doyle

With the growing popularity of cloud environments and cloud-like architectures, the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) paradigm has become increasingly important. Having been the previous big buzzword in IT, the term SOA has often been used as a means to sell software products instead of a term to refer to architectural style. However, in order to benefit most from the new possibilities in virtualization, just-in-time provisioning and on-demand scalability it has become a must for businesses to partition their enterprise logic and functionality into individual components which can independently be deployed in heterogeneous environments.

One of the goals of an SOA is to provide the enterprise with a set of re-usable, readily available business services, and as such reduce cost and provide greater operational agility. The autonomous nature of well-defined services make these components the perfect candidate for deployment in cloud environments. These individual services can then be combined, or composed into business applications which provide the actual business value. The specific compositions of these services in fact defines the actual business process.

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Tip/Trick of the Month: Using Highly Available Clusters with Red Hat Messaging

by Bruce Wolfe (Red Hat)

Red Hat Messaging (RHM) is built on top of the AMQP wire-level protocol, and is designed to be inherently reliable. However, if you have the resources, you can make your messaging application more robust with the addition of High Availability (HA) Clustering.

To set up a simple cluster you will need to edit three files, and populate the same values across each RHM broker and/or RHEL host instance:

/etc/corosync/corosync.conf

In the totem section add the network bind address (bindnetaddr), multicast address (mcastaddr), and multicast port (mcastport). For example, respectively: 192.168.10.0, 224.0.0.10, 5430

/etc/corosync/uidgid.d/qpidd

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What’s new with Red Hat Training courses

by Pete Hnath (Red Hat)

Innovate or die. It’s the essence of what successful companies do, especially in the tech space. At Red Hat, there is ongoing innovation in every dimension of the business, with new products like CloudForms, new infrastructure like the Customer Portal and new metrics like Net Promoter.

The Curriculum team is similarly pushing to innovate with our course offerings and course delivery. In the last year we’ve completely changed the way Red Hat courses are taught to ensure the most hands-on experience possible. Gone are hour long, death-by-slide lectures. Students are actively engaged through multiple teaching approaches and near-continuous labs focused on solving problems rather than tools and technologies. Instructors are now armed with comprehensive guides with best practices on how to teach topics, resulting in across-the-board consistency and a more optimal student learning environment.

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