What if you could make DevOps easy and reliable?

by Jurgen Hoffman (Red Hat)

OpenShift is great! Developers can quickly start development on a new project. Just log into the web console, create a new application, select a gear and start coding. When you are done implementing a feature you push to OpenShift and after a few seconds you can admire and share your work with the whole world.

But there is more to consider when working with OpenShift. What if you develop in teams? Usually applications are not directly deployed into production. How can I implement a staging process harnessing the OpenShift Infrastructure? How do I know if my changes passed an Acceptance Test or failed it? How does a test team know which features have been implemented?

The answer to these questions are usually not easy, and every company has implemented their own set of processes to address these problems. Although some Organizations have automated some of their IT Infrastructure, there are still a lot of manual processes and changes involved when it comes down to taking a particular software release from development into production. On the other hand, the business stakeholders have a high interest into a fast and efficient Release process, because every day that my feature is not in production and available to my users, is lowering my ROI.

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Building the intelligent enterprise: easy and inexpensive?

by Alan Hale (Red Hat)

The following article originally appeared here in the UK and here in Germany.

Who could have predicted the impact on mainstream businesses of data coming in via social media and mobile technology, the escalating importance of trends such as ‘big data’ or the move towards cloud computing that is now gathering momentum?

The sources of data coming into the enterprise IT infrastructure are proliferating, with new channels and touch-points constantly emerging at an unprecedented rate. Clearly, in an uncertain world, flexibility is a critical component of any business IT strategy.

With today’s customers choosing to interact through multiple channels, businesses are wasting time and budget ‘hand-carrying’ information from application to application, frequently without adding value at best and introducing human error at worst.

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JBoss Certification News

by Randy Russell (Red Hat)

Red Hat has just released a new certification in support of its JBoss Enterprise Middleware line. Red Hat Certified JBoss Developer (RHCJD) is earned by passing a rigorous, hands-on lab exam that tests one’s ability to write, extend and modify JBoss Enterprise Edition (JEE) applications that will run on the Enterprise Application Platform.

Ever since Red Hat acquired JBoss in 2006, there has long been a certain tension between testing and certifying the “JBoss-centric” versus the “spec-level”. RHCJD is where Red Hat puts a stake in the ground and offers what we believe will become THE certification for JEE spec-level programming. There is a growing vacuum of leadership in this space and we intend to fill it. RHCJD gives us a core credential upon which we will build and extend the JBoss certification program for developers.

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Tips and Tricks: JBoss Enterprise Application Development (JB225)

by Jim Rigsbee (Red Hat)

Converting a web project generated by the JBoss Developer Studio CDI Web Project wizard to a Maven project will give you the power of the Maven build system with its dependency management, build life cycles, and automated JEE packaging abilities. To covert a JBoss Developer Studio web project, follow these steps:

1. Right click on the project name in the Project Explorer tree and select Configure → Convert to Maven Project… In the wizard steps be sure to select WAR packaging.

2. Configure the Java SE 6 compiler plugin so that we can process annotations. Add this to pom.xml file:

<build>
  <plugins>
    <plugin>
      <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
        <configuration>
          <source>1.6</source>
            <target>1.6</target>
      </configuration>
    </plugin>
  </plugins>
</build>

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Red Hat Fuse Demonstration with videos

by Kenny Peeples (Red Hat)

The post below originally appeared here on March 14, 2013.

On March 12, 2013, Red Hat announced the addition of Red Hat Fuse and JBoss A-MQ to its enterprise middleware portfolio, which are based on Apache Camel and Active MQ. The announcement is here.

Additional information including software downloads are located at http://www.jboss.org/jbossfuse and http://www.jboss.org/jbossamq

I am updating the videos for better sound and content but here is the first preview of the Fuse WebSocket HTML 5 demo.

The videos will help you build your first application in Fuse.

Video Part 1: Part 1 Getting Started
Video Part 2: Part 2 Getting Started
Video Part 3: Part 3 Getting Started

Source Code located on github at: https://github.com/kpeeples/jboss-fuse-websockets-demo-1.git

Migration planning using JBoss Cake

by Emily Brand (Red Hat)

Starting research on how to migrate your applications to JBoss can be an overwhelming process. Taking the migration in small steps will help manage expectations and increase the success of the effort. The major steps for planning include creating a project management office, completing a current state analysis, and creating a diagram specifying how applications interface with each other throughout your organization. With that information in hand you are ready to create a project plan and begin the migration.

Create a Project Management Office (PMO)
Decide which project managers will be the overall leads of the project. If you are missing resources that are capable of project managing, Red Hat Consulting can help augment your PMO and train your project managers for migrations.

The PMO will handle scheduling by creating a project plan. The project plan should originally be a high level document specifying the list of applications and the project start and end date. Managing and mitigating risks is the number one goal of the project manager. The PMO will also be in charge of holding individuals accountable for sticking to the project plan after achieving buy-in as well as coordinating communication throughout all of the necessary parties including infrastructure, database, and application teams.

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Taste of Training Preview: EAP6 clustering over TCP

by Will Dinyes (Red Hat)

With the recent release of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 6, Red Hat is ensuring that developers and administrators alike are getting more for less. More performance, for less memory. More services, with less configuration. And more management tools, with less hassles. In conjunction, the Red Hat Training team has been hard at work integrating more into our JBoss courses. First, we updated our popular JBoss Application Administration I course (JB248). Now we are set to release our updated course JBoss Application Adminisration II (JB348). Available in December, JBoss Application Administration II will bring all of the advanced topics we covered in our similar course for EAP 5, such as clustering, performance tuning, and JBoss Operations Network, and will add even more content specific to EAP 6, covering CLI scripting, messaging providers, and an introduction to OpenShift.

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Tips & Tricks: JB348 Application Administration II

by Bruce Wolfe (Red Hat)

Furtureproof Installation

When planning your installation of JBoss EAP 6, you have three choices; ZIP, JAR or RPM. The JAR based installer is, arguably, the best and most flexible option because it will generate an answer file that can be used for silent, repeatable installs; great if you have to install JBoss on multiple servers (e.g. clustering). Using the answer file, repeat the install with:

$ java -jar jboss-eap-installer-<version>.jar <answer_file>.xml

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