BPM, EA and Compliance

A few years ago, I was invited to join a debate forum belonging to a group of companies that despite not being involved with the financial segment, discussed the workings of each other’s internal controls areas, SOX compliance and benchmarking practices.

First of all, why were BPM and EA specialists invited to this forum, and second, why am I publishing matters of internal controls in a BPM area that contributes to the subjects of Enterprise Architecture?

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BPM and its contribution to Enterprise Architecture

When employing the homonym “BPM,” it is important to clarify the difference between Technical BPM and Business BPM. Technical BPM covers not only the IT tools for business process automation, but also contributes as another available resource for a company to perfect its process management.

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BPM in a Microservice World: Part 3

This article was originally published on Diabolical Labs.

Many BPM practitioners are used to utilizing a software suite that has some sort of Process Manager component that has control of the transaction as it progresses through activities. The process is generally authored and visualized graphically in BPMN or BPEL. When applying BPM in the microservice world we don’t have that visibility or control.

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BPM in a Microservice World: Part 2

This article was originally published on Diabolical Labs.

Back in the early days of “workflow” we had control of the transaction, usually a document, from the start of the process to the end. As IT evolved into the SOA/ESB era, we had a little bit less control but for the most part the process engine orchestrated everything.

There were frequent hand-offs to message queues but normally the message would come back to the process engine so it would continue to orchestrate the process.

The microservice world is different. Instead of having a process engine or an ESB controlling a small number of large services, we have many small services that can potentially send and receive messages or respond to events from any of the other services.

It’s more like a web. One initiating message or event to a particular service could affect the exchange of many hundreds of messages between the microservices before the initial request is considered complete. That can make BPM practitioners a bit uneasy due to the loss of control.

We may not have control any longer but we still can have visibility into the process. We can still apply our usual patterns for SLA and exception management, and human and compensating workflows. This can be accomplished through what I call a “tracking” process.

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BPM in a Microservice World: Part 1

This article was originally published on Diabolical Labs.

Business Process Management (BPM)-enabling software has been around for decades, having started as document centric workflow. It’s progressed into the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) age to become an orchestrator of services and human tasks.

Now, we see that the Service Architecture is evolving to include a relatively new concept called Microservice Architecture (MSA). That architecture along with enabling technologies like Cloud Services and Application Containers is allowing us to apply process management practices to solutions in a much more lightweight and agile way.

In the upcoming blog post series, I’ll be exploring the application of BPM principles to solutions that can implemented with MSA. In this first part, I’ll review traditional BPM practices and their pitfalls, followed by a guide to begin the convergence of BPM and MSA. re with MSA.

You can also learn more in the webinar I’ll be hosting on 9/27 at 11am ET.

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A Future-Proof Design for Delivering Better Product Faster

Custom software development and business automation have traditionally been two distinct ways to approach IT solutions to business challenges. Each approach has its own tradeoffs. While software development draws from engineering rigor, historically, the processes have been slow. Conversely, while business automation has enabled non-engineering stakeholders to codify business logic, this has led to additional risk.

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BPM: Utilizing JBoss technologies to increase business performance and agility

by Duncan Doyle

With the growing popularity of cloud environments and cloud-like architectures, the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) paradigm has become increasingly important. Having been the previous big buzzword in IT, the term SOA has often been used as a means to sell software products instead of a term to refer to architectural style. However, in order to benefit most from the new possibilities in virtualization, just-in-time provisioning and on-demand scalability it has become a must for businesses to partition their enterprise logic and functionality into individual components which can independently be deployed in heterogeneous environments.

One of the goals of an SOA is to provide the enterprise with a set of re-usable, readily available business services, and as such reduce cost and provide greater operational agility. The autonomous nature of well-defined services make these components the perfect candidate for deployment in cloud environments. These individual services can then be combined, or composed into business applications which provide the actual business value. The specific compositions of these services in fact defines the actual business process.

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