Taste of Training Preview: EAP6 clustering over TCP

by Will Dinyes (Red Hat)

With the recent release of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 6, Red Hat is ensuring that developers and administrators alike are getting more for less. More performance, for less memory. More services, with less configuration. And more management tools, with less hassles. In conjunction, the Red Hat Training team has been hard at work integrating more into our JBoss courses. First, we updated our popular JBoss Application Administration I course (JB248). Now we are set to release our updated course JBoss Application Adminisration II (JB348). Available in December, JBoss Application Administration II will bring all of the advanced topics we covered in our similar course for EAP 5, such as clustering, performance tuning, and JBoss Operations Network, and will add even more content specific to EAP 6, covering CLI scripting, messaging providers, and an introduction to OpenShift.

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Migration strategy 2.0: Plan a services-focused approach for greatest success

by Thomas Crowe (Red Hat)

As an experienced IT professional, chances are you’ve been involved with a migration of some sort. Whether it’s a simple migration, such as moving static data to another node or a highly complex migration across datacenters, all successful migrations have one thing in common – rock solid planning. Migrations that are attempted without the requisite planning can be fraught with peril, and end up with disastrous consequences

Ultimately, users, our customers, do not really care if a given server is up or down. They care whether they can access a specific application, such as email, a web site, or data. It is the service that users care about, and it is the service in which migration planning needs to be focused.

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Business value of open source software

by Satish Irrinki (Red Hat)

It’s a truism that adopting open source software (OSS) reduces costs, but that’s not all. Let’s make a deeper dive into the business value of adopting OSS and uncover how the adoption provides immense value at multiple levels of an organization. The value proposition for OSS can be attributed to three groups within an organization – Technical Buyers, Business Buyers, and Economic Buyers.

Technical Buyers
Technical buyers can be best described as the line managers who are operating under stringent budgets to do more with fewer resources. As a result they aim to reduce costs and increase efficiencies within their operating units. In a bid to increase their resources utilizations, the technical buyers seek to increase reliability and flexibility in their operations. To achieve these goals they use systems that are reliable, adhere to standard specifications, and low in cost.

The high level of collaboration and contribution within the OSS development model accelerates the number of features that typical open source software provides. Availability of source code allows the adopters to make custom changes and tailor the software for specific needs. The ability to reuse software components across the organization (develop once and use within multiple systems) reduces the unit cost of development. These virtues of OSS mesh well with the goals of technical buyers and make OSS a viable option when making technology decisions.

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Video Blog: An introduction to Red Hat Online Learning

by Pete Hnath (Red Hat)

Learning is a continuous process throughout a career. It can be a challenge to get away from the “day job” to attend a week of training. Traditional eLearning is fine for some things, but its not a good fit for IT professionals who expect a robust lab environment and don’t care for Flash animations. Ideally, a self-paced training program would deliver the quality of experience they get from a traditional class, but on their own schedule.

Red Hat Training has just launched a new self-paced training offering called Red Hat Online Learning (ROLE) that we believe does just that. Red Hat Online Learning features a true lab environment delivered via the Amazon cloud, enabling students to complete the same labs they would in a traditional classroom. The course content is based closely on our coursebooks which have been extended into a more narrative format appropriate for self-study. To deliver the insights a student would typically get from the instructor, each Red Hat Online Learning course includes dozens of recorded screencasts, produced by former senior Red Hat instructors. Together, the labs, course materials and screencasts provide a robust, multi-faceted learning experience that is as close to the classroom experience as we could get.

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Guest post: My journey to RHCA

The following post was authored by Pete Durst, instructor and director of technology at ExitCertified, a Red Hat Training partner with locations throughout the United States and Canada. Delivering training since 1991, Pete was named Red Hat FY12 architect-level instructor of the year for North America, and recently became a Red Hat Certified Architect, the highest level of certification for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are Pete’s.

Many years ago, when I first became aware of the different Red Hat certifications, I thought nothing of what it meant to be an RHCT or RHCE. These appeared to be similar to other vendor’s certifications, like Sun’s SCSA and SCNA, and had similar value to me. Upon further investigation, it became apparent that while those certifications were gained through online testing methods that used multiple-choice questions and fill-in-the-blank essays, Red Hat used hands on, practical testing. It’s one thing to say that you know how to do something and it’s another to prove that you know how to use it, by actually setting up a server and making it perform as expected.

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Guest Post / Martin Elliott: From computer club to computer career

Our partners are typically closer to students than we at Red Hat headquarters are. As such, we like to regularly hear from both of them for insight into training, into the IT industry and into IT professionals. One such training partner, 1Staff Training, is certainly among those with a finger squarely on the pulse of what’s happening in IT education. Based in Omaha, Nebraska, 1Staff Training has been delivering technical training since 1996, educating over 28,000 students and rating consistently as a leader in IT education by the International Data Corporation. 1Staff Training recently spoke with one of its Red Hat System Administration I (RH124) students to get his thoughts about the course and his career, and how both are interrelated.

NOTE: The opinions, statements and other information included in this post are those solely of the interview subject and may not be representative of Red Hat.

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Guest Post: Bruno Lima, Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year, EMEA

by Bruno Lima

Becoming EMEA’s Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year was very easy. I just wrote a letter and crossed my fingers, haha. Jokes aside, I believe I became a Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year because when I entered my submission, I not only wrote a reply, I relayed how Red Hat is integral to both the story of my life and in my career. From the innovative projects I’ve participated in to the satisfaction of our customers, Red Hat has meant a lot to me.

I started using Red Hat technologies in the mid-90s when open source was still unknown by many and ignored by almost everyone. I remember my first installation of Red Hat, which was at a public company in a small town called Sao Luis in Brazil. It was where I was born and raised. The company needed a reliable solution to run an electronic mail system, and at that moment the only platform that met our needs was to use the Red Hat Linux with Sendmail. I never stopped using Red Hat technologies after that, using Red Hat and open source for more and more projects.

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A new view on migrations

by Larry Spangler (Red Hat)

The funny thing about people is that as much as we complain about how bad things are, there’s a natural resistance to actual change. More often than not, the changes we long for come with a good deal of anxiety and a great deal of process pain.

This week, we moved into our new space in the “Red Hat Tower” in downtown Raleigh. There was a lot of excitement leading up to this move – new offices, new space, new neighbors, new opportunities – a fresh start all around. But that was countered by an equal amount of uncertainty and anxiety – would we like the new space, would we be giving up amenities, would the new commutes be a hassle, how long would it take to be productive again?

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