Red Hat Fuse Demonstration with videos

by Kenny Peeples (Red Hat)

The post below originally appeared here on March 14, 2013.

On March 12, 2013, Red Hat announced the addition of Red Hat Fuse and JBoss A-MQ to its enterprise middleware portfolio, which are based on Apache Camel and Active MQ. The announcement is here.

Additional information including software downloads are located at http://www.jboss.org/jbossfuse and http://www.jboss.org/jbossamq

I am updating the videos for better sound and content but here is the first preview of the Fuse WebSocket HTML 5 demo.

The videos will help you build your first application in Fuse.

Video Part 1: Part 1 Getting Started
Video Part 2: Part 2 Getting Started
Video Part 3: Part 3 Getting Started

Source Code located on github at: https://github.com/kpeeples/jboss-fuse-websockets-demo-1.git

Producing a Red Hat Training Course, Part 2

by Wander Boessenkool (Red Hat)

In the previous part of this series we explored the tools used by the Red Hat Curriculum Team to develop training courses. In this post we will explore the process behind our course development.

Outline

The process we follow when creating a new course consists of a number of steps.

  • Course Focus/Objective
  • Learner Analysis
  • Task Analysis
  • Classroom Setup
  • Lab Development
  • Content Development
  • Lab QA
  • Editorial Work
  • Course Pilot
  • Post Pilot Fixes
  • General Availability

Continue reading “Producing a Red Hat Training Course, Part 2”

Guest post: Preparing for Red Hat exams

by Kenneth Poliran

Below is the second in a series of posts by actual Red Hat Certified Professionals offering their preparation tips for taking Red Hat exams. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s and not necessarily those of Red Hat Training.

When I began with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), I started with zero knowledge. As a system administrator, I had been working mostly on other operating systems, but not on RHEL. I had been asked to set up a server for a client that wanted a Linux environment because of its stability and performance with clustered environments, so I quickly browsed for Red Hat courses for and enrolled in class. After completing the course, next came the heart-stopping RHCSA exam, but I wasn’t that worried since I felt prepared for that day.

My preparation/suggestions:

Continue reading “Guest post: Preparing for Red Hat exams”

Guest Post: Preparing for Red Hat exams

by Anderson Silva

Below is the first in a series of posts by actual Red Hat Certified Professionals offering their preparation tips for taking Red Hat exams. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s and not necessarily those of Red Hat Training.

I have been working for Red Hat for over 5 years, and throughout these years I have had the opportunity to take several Red Hat Training courses and earn a few certifications. These certifications include: Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHEL5, 2007), Red Hat Certified Architect (2010) and Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHEL6, 2012).

So, when I read that the good people at Red Hat Training were looking for some ‘How do you prepare’ for Red Hat training courses and exams, I thought I had something to offer.

Red Hat Training courses are usually set up in a small classroom environment with 4 days of lectures, Monday through Thursday, and the exam on Friday. Throughout the years, the amount of time the exam takes has changed a bit, but one can be sure to take up at least your entire morning on Friday.

Continue reading “Guest Post: Preparing for Red Hat exams”

2013 Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year

The Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year Award is back, and it’s time for Red Hat Certified Professionals (RHCPs) to submit their stories.

Red Hat will again be honoring the hard work, expertise, and ingenuity of some of the world’s premier IT professionals through its annual contest. The 2013 version of this contest will be open to all Red Hat Certification credentials (RHCSA, RHCE, RHCVA, RHCSS, RHCDS, RHCA, JBCAA, JBCD, and Red Hat Certificates of Expertise).

To be considered for the 2013 RHCP of the Year contest, you must be a current Red Hat Certified Professional and complete the online form. You will be asked to provide a 500-words-or-fewer summary that details how you innovatively and creatively used your Red Hat Certified skills to enhance your IT environment, increase system performance, tightened system security, and/or otherwise deliver results for your organization. Red Hat will accept submissions now through March 8, 2013.

Continue reading “2013 Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year”

Producing a Red Hat Training Course – Part 1

by Wander Boessenkool (Red Hat)

Producing a Red Hat Training course takes a lot of hard, but also thankful, work. In this series of posts I will explore the workflow that goes into producing a single course.

To satisfy our technical readers we still start this series with a post about the tools we use to produce our output documents, from the slide-decks used by our instructors, through the PDF files sent to our printers to produce the printed version of our Instructor Guides and Student Workbooks, to the HTML content and stylesheets used for our Red Hat Online Learning offering.

Single Source Publishing

All of our course materials are authored in DocBook, an XML dialect designed for producing texts, ranging from a one page article all the way up to a set of multiple books. Using DocBook we can then easily convert a single set of source files describing a book into a wide range of output formats using XSL transforms.

Continue reading “Producing a Red Hat Training Course – Part 1”

Migration planning using JBoss Cake

by Emily Brand (Red Hat)

Starting research on how to migrate your applications to JBoss can be an overwhelming process. Taking the migration in small steps will help manage expectations and increase the success of the effort. The major steps for planning include creating a project management office, completing a current state analysis, and creating a diagram specifying how applications interface with each other throughout your organization. With that information in hand you are ready to create a project plan and begin the migration.

Create a Project Management Office (PMO)
Decide which project managers will be the overall leads of the project. If you are missing resources that are capable of project managing, Red Hat Consulting can help augment your PMO and train your project managers for migrations.

The PMO will handle scheduling by creating a project plan. The project plan should originally be a high level document specifying the list of applications and the project start and end date. Managing and mitigating risks is the number one goal of the project manager. The PMO will also be in charge of holding individuals accountable for sticking to the project plan after achieving buy-in as well as coordinating communication throughout all of the necessary parties including infrastructure, database, and application teams.

Continue reading “Migration planning using JBoss Cake”

Five top tips for the journey to cloud

by Malcolm Herbert (Red Hat)

The post below originally appeared here on November 22, 2012.

A comparison between enterprise IT and public cloud computing dramatically highlights the benefits of moving to cloud.

Application deployment times can shrink from weeks in the traditional data centre to minutes in a cloud data centre; new application development time accelerates from years to weeks (or months at most); cost per virtual machine plummets from dollars to cents; server administrator ratios can explode from 20:1 to 300:1; while efficiency increases, with resource utilisation soaring from 20% to 75%.

With measurable benefits like these, it’s no wonder that IDC expects that by 2015 the majority of the enterprise market will require integrated hybrid cloud management capabilities (Source: IDC Cloud Management Study, 2011 Survey).

Continue reading “Five top tips for the journey to cloud”