New Red Hat Services Sessions at Red Hat Summit Virtual Experience

Coinciding with Red Hat® Summit Virtual Experience: Open House, an experience that provides you access to all-new sessions and live opportunities to ask Red Hat technology experts questions on key topics, our Red Hat Global Services team is releasing new sessions! Continue learning from our Services experts as they share their knowledge, customer insights, and best practices with a focus on: client success, deep expertise, and emerging technology adoption. 

 

Our newly released Red Hat Services sessions include:

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REST Architecture

“A [person] thinks that by mouthing hard words he or she understands hard things.” – Herman Melville 

 

How many times have you met with a team of engineers, architects, or even clients to talk about the designs of a software feature, and a single word used caused mass confusion because everyone had a slightly different definition? (Ugh, why are words so hard?!)

 

I have never found a more challenging concept to talk about than Representational State Transfer (REST). What does REST and being RESTful mean? Are resources the same thing as entities? Where do representations come into the mix? This blog post will answer these questions and describe the RESTful architectural style.

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Business is changing: the New Normal after COVID-19

The coronavirus pandemic has created much more than a global health emergency. COVID-19 has forced important changes in the daily lives of individuals and companies worldwide. 

 

More than two billion people in the four corners of the planet have been quarantined to curb the spread of the disease. Many industries stopped their production lines, stores have closed their doors, and companies had to adapt their ways of working. Many people needed to relearn how to organize their routines.

 

But, if everything has a good side, the unprecedented situation created by the pandemic gave birth to good ideas. It helped to accelerate business changes that have been under discussion for a long time. Business agility is now a must to survive. Technology and collaboration, which are gaining more and more space in the construction of a “new normal” is essential to support the new routine of individuals and organizations.

 

Long after leaving, the pandemic will leave some positive points to be incorporated into the routines, helping to transform visions, optimize resources, and improve the day to day for employees and managers. In a post-coronavirus era, it will be essential to:

 

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User Federation with Red Hat Single Sign On

Many organizations often have existing user data-stores that hold information about users and their credentials. Typically, enterprise applications would have different user bases and the underlying user account management systems might be different for each of the applications.
To handle the complexity associated with multiple user data-stores, each application layer will have to have a suitable authentication module that handles authentication & authorization with the underlying user account management systems. This results in the proliferation of authentication modules for each application and it gets closely tied with application life-cycle.
In this session, you’ll learn how Keycloak/RHSSO provides a unified way to federate different user account systems. More specifically, you’ll see how effectively the user accounts from an external LDAP server and a MySQL database (that holds user accounts) could be federated with the help of Keycloak/RHSSO.

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Breaking Silos using the power of Infrastructure as Data in Kubernetes

“I don’t have permission to do this!” That’s one of many phrases that I used to hear from a couple of developers when trying to introduce them to a Configuration Management tool. This barrier was, and still is in some cases, a major obstacle in companies that didn’t adhere to the DevOps movement and practices, a problem that I like to call as “The Wall”. If you are questioning, yes, I am a huge Pink Floyd fan! 

“The Wall” is characterized when, for some reason(s), developers, and operations don’t find a middle ground and share the responsibilities. What it will probably result in is a rigid and unreliable application. In a world, where requirements are constantly modified due to customer behavior, these teams will likely fail, when trying to achieve a stable, resilient, and flexible platform. It’s not easy to deal with this cultural problem, and one of the main pillars that support this is technical complexity. All sides have their own specifics, problems, architecture, languages… If we just throw packages from one side to the other, we are just adding “another brick in the wall”. There is a necessity to translate this entanglement and meet halfway, working with platforms like Kubernetes, a container orchestrator that can provide a smooth approach when introducing teams to areas that they didn’t know before.

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Cloud-native business automation with Kogito

Kogito is a cloud-native business automation framework for building intelligent business applications. It is based on battle-tested runtime components (like Drools, jBPM, OptaPlanner), and it allows the development of process and business rules centric cloud-native applications for orchestrating distributed microservices and container-native applications. It takes advantage of the many benefits of the container-native platforms (like Kubernetes, OpenShift) as it was designed from the ground up for those platforms.

 

Some of the distinguishing characteristics of Kogito are as follows:

 

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How to control Container-Native Applications with Ansible Operator

Container-native applications are becoming more and more complex, consisting of various services and features, each component with its own security constraints and complex network policy rules. This makes it more difficult to perform day two operations once the cloud-native applications are deployed. 

While upgrades, patches, and provisioning can be done using Ansible playbooks or Helm Charts, application lifecycle, storage lifecycle, and other deeper analysis cannot be done and requires application support team intervention. 

Operator Framework initiative introduced Operator-SDK framework several years ago to standardize Kubernetes Operators development and make it easier for the Kubernetes community to create Operators and control container-native applications lifecycle. 

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