Business-level impact with integrated cloud-native applications, at Red Hat Summit

In isolation, cloud-native development doesn’t have a lot of meaning. To be truly agile and take advantage of cloud-native technology, organizations must think beyond code and focus on how to deliver business value quickly, with quality, while the market moves quickly. This change in thinking comes with a renewed focus on the people and processes involved in developing new capabilities – value comes from communication across teams.

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Business-level impact with automation, at Red Hat Summit

Decreasing time to market is not the only business impact you can realize through automation and management. Utilizing Red Hat’s approach to transformation, you can shift the focus to the culture within your organization, allowing companies to quickly adapt to market shifts. Our approach is all encompassing, not focusing on one particular technology, but promoting people and processes to extend open source and open ways of working that in turn promote organization-wide efficiencies that take transformation to the next level.

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Enterprise-wide approach to open transformation, at Red Hat Summit

Our new era is one of unprecedented change—and possibility. The rapid pace of disruption and innovation that we call digital transformation is fueled by the combination of people, process and technology; forcing interactions at levels we have never before seen, to fundamentally remake the enterprise. While many organizations are relying on cutting edge technology to fuel transformation, experts, and our own experience, tell us that just adding new technologies to the portfolio is not enough to win at transformation. 

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Business-level impact with container adoption, at Red Hat Summit

The importance of utilizing containers goes beyond being a supporting block for agile and DevOps. Utilizing new technology can help organizations realize people and process changes that support modernization and container adoption is an opportunity and a catalyst that helps to cause a chain reaction in the way organizations deliver software.

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What factors make companies fail to adopt emerging technologies?

Innovating and adopting emerging technology is practically mandatory for any company, regardless of its segment of activity, due to systems and technology now supporting the business, and the way companies sell their products or provide services to their customers.

Everybody talks about emerging technologies and the importance of companies adopting such technologies that are super innovative and have great potential to transform the way we work. However, because they are still recent and have not been widely explored or tested, they generate insecurity and challenges at the time of adoption.

To adopt innovative technologies, it is necessary to understand the challenges brought with it and look for ways to facilitate massive adoption. After all, there is no point in just having one silo or department interested in adopting emerging technologies, if the rest of the organization does not understand the benefits of this change.

But what are the real factors that blocker emerging tech adoption within companies?

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Deliver value with distributed teams through the power of open

It’s uncontested that open source communities have been at the center of innovation for decades, enabling and accelerating innovation through distributed developers’ contributions. What’s also become clear over time is that the outcomes of the open-source development model are anchored in ways of working and unsaid cultural principles and practices that enable these communities to thrive. 

Red Hat, the leader in open-source, has boiled down the underpinnings of open source innovation in five principles that make up what we call open culture: transparency, collaboration, adaptability, community, and inclusivity. These principles — a bedrock to Red Hat’s innovative model for decades — have never been put to the test more than in the current climate when remote work has become the norm, and leaders rely on high-performing remote teams to continue to deliver tangible business outcomes and innovation. Business goals may need to be adapted in the current climate, but initiatives, milestones, and initiatives don’t disappear. Working in an agile manner is critical.

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Virtual work strategies that are making an impact

By now, you have probably adjusted to where the glare comes from on your computer screen as you try to conference call from the living room or exactly which light to turn on to give you that movie-star-in-quarantine look when you flip on your webcam for your team meetings. We are in very unique times for many work professionals.

Many of us are accustomed to getting dressed, commuting into the office, sitting down at a desk, and enjoying the occasional water-cooler talk or team lunch. Now, thanks to the amazing efforts of those companies who can afford to work virtually, we are instead waking up and trying to juggle personal and work commitments from our homes.

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Four Principles for Building a Culture of Automation

This article was originally posted on enterpriseai.news.

It’s estimated that 75 percent of an IT professional’s time is spent “keeping the lights on” with the remaining 25 percent focused on innovation that moves their businesses forward. Everyone should want to flip those percentages. After all, both executives and developers want the same thing: to drive innovation that helps improve the bottom line.

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