BPM in a Microservice World: Part 2

This article was originally published on Diabolical Labs.

Back in the early days of “workflow” we had control of the transaction, usually a document, from the start of the process to the end. As IT evolved into the SOA/ESB era, we had a little bit less control but for the most part the process engine orchestrated everything.

There were frequent hand-offs to message queues but normally the message would come back to the process engine so it would continue to orchestrate the process.

The microservice world is different. Instead of having a process engine or an ESB controlling a small number of large services, we have many small services that can potentially send and receive messages or respond to events from any of the other services.

It’s more like a web. One initiating message or event to a particular service could affect the exchange of many hundreds of messages between the microservices before the initial request is considered complete. That can make BPM practitioners a bit uneasy due to the loss of control.

We may not have control any longer but we still can have visibility into the process. We can still apply our usual patterns for SLA and exception management, and human and compensating workflows. This can be accomplished through what I call a “tracking” process.

Continue reading “BPM in a Microservice World: Part 2”

BPM in a Microservice World: Part 1

This article was originally published on Diabolical Labs.

Business Process Management (BPM)-enabling software has been around for decades, having started as document centric workflow. It’s progressed into the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) age to become an orchestrator of services and human tasks.

Now, we see that the Service Architecture is evolving to include a relatively new concept called Microservice Architecture (MSA). That architecture along with enabling technologies like Cloud Services and Application Containers is allowing us to apply process management practices to solutions in a much more lightweight and agile way.

In the upcoming blog post series, I’ll be exploring the application of BPM principles to solutions that can implemented with MSA. In this first part, I’ll review traditional BPM practices and their pitfalls, followed by a guide to begin the convergence of BPM and MSA. re with MSA.

You can also learn more in the webinar I’ll be hosting on 9/27 at 11am ET.

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Continue reading “BPM in a Microservice World: Part 1”

Build your next cloud-based PaaS in under an hour

This post was originally published on the Red Hat Developers Blog.

The charter of Open Innovation Labs is to help our customers accelerate application development and realize the latest advancements in software delivery, by providing skills, mentoring, and tools. Some of the challenges I frequently hear from customers are those around Platform as a Service (PaaS) environment provisioning and configuration. This article is first in the series of articles that guide you through installation configuration and usage of the Red Hat Open Container Project (OCP) on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Continue reading “Build your next cloud-based PaaS in under an hour”

Training As An Investment

In an effort to save expenses, enterprises think they can avoid training their teams. How does skimping on training truly impact the performance of the individual and the health of the overall organization? For IT leaders, these are critical questions that they must consider. What is the cost of a team without expertise?

Continue reading “Training As An Investment”

Automating the provisioning and configuration of Red Hat Mobile Application Platform

In the second part of this two-part series that is focused on applying contemporary application development practices like continuous delivery and DevOps to mobile application development, I will demonstrate how to use Ansible to fully automate the deployment of a Mobile Application Platform, running on OpenShift Container Platform. I will then walk through a tutorial of how to use Jenkins to create a continuous delivery pipeline for doing mobile app development.

Continue reading “Automating the provisioning and configuration of Red Hat Mobile Application Platform”