Mounting a Volume Using the Native Client when a Server is Down

by Wander Boessenkool (Red Hat)

Replicated Red Hat Storage Server Volumes provide you with high-availability, when a single server goes down all your data is still there. Even better, if you were using that server to access your data using the native client it will automatically switch over to a server that is still responding. But what if you want to mount the volume while the server you normally use is down?

When you want to mount a Red Hat Storage Server Volume from your /etc/fstab you normally use a line like this:

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Guest Post: Preparing for Red Hat exams

By Damian Tommasino

Why Certify?

The demand for Linux engineers today is growing rapidly with the increase of “cloud” services. More and more organizations want their data to be available everywhere they go with zero downtime to their applications. This kind of demand from organizations requires that engineers know their “stuff” cold. When a web server goes down or a disk fails, you don’t have time to Google for an answer while there is a service outage affecting all of your customers. Becoming Red Hat certified is just one way to set yourself apart when showing potential, or current, employers that you can rise to the challenge.

Red Hat has clearly recognized these types of challenges that engineers and administrators face today when they developed their exams. Instead of the normal Q & A you would expect, these exams are fully hands-on. This lab style exam format helps to set Red Hat apart from other vendors by showing that certified individuals are highly experienced in their roles. For me, having Linux experience is critical to my job and being certified (from multiple vendors) shows expertise to my clients and peers.

Exam Format

The two main Red Hat exams are the Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) exam, and the Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) exam. As previously mentioned, each exam is completely hands-on and requires a solid proficiency of Red Hat Enterprise Linux in order to pass. The RHCSA is two and half (2.5) hours long, while the RHCE is two (2) hours.

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What if you could make DevOps easy and reliable?

by Jurgen Hoffman (Red Hat)

OpenShift is great! Developers can quickly start development on a new project. Just log into the web console, create a new application, select a gear and start coding. When you are done implementing a feature you push to OpenShift and after a few seconds you can admire and share your work with the whole world.

But there is more to consider when working with OpenShift. What if you develop in teams? Usually applications are not directly deployed into production. How can I implement a staging process harnessing the OpenShift Infrastructure? How do I know if my changes passed an Acceptance Test or failed it? How does a test team know which features have been implemented?

The answer to these questions are usually not easy, and every company has implemented their own set of processes to address these problems. Although some Organizations have automated some of their IT Infrastructure, there are still a lot of manual processes and changes involved when it comes down to taking a particular software release from development into production. On the other hand, the business stakeholders have a high interest into a fast and efficient Release process, because every day that my feature is not in production and available to my users, is lowering my ROI.

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Building the intelligent enterprise: easy and inexpensive?

by Alan Hale (Red Hat)

The following article originally appeared here in the UK and here in Germany.

Who could have predicted the impact on mainstream businesses of data coming in via social media and mobile technology, the escalating importance of trends such as ‘big data’ or the move towards cloud computing that is now gathering momentum?

The sources of data coming into the enterprise IT infrastructure are proliferating, with new channels and touch-points constantly emerging at an unprecedented rate. Clearly, in an uncertain world, flexibility is a critical component of any business IT strategy.

With today’s customers choosing to interact through multiple channels, businesses are wasting time and budget ‘hand-carrying’ information from application to application, frequently without adding value at best and introducing human error at worst.

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JBoss Certification News

by Randy Russell (Red Hat)

Red Hat has just released a new certification in support of its JBoss Enterprise Middleware line. Red Hat Certified JBoss Developer (RHCJD) is earned by passing a rigorous, hands-on lab exam that tests one’s ability to write, extend and modify JBoss Enterprise Edition (JEE) applications that will run on the Enterprise Application Platform.

Ever since Red Hat acquired JBoss in 2006, there has long been a certain tension between testing and certifying the “JBoss-centric” versus the “spec-level”. RHCJD is where Red Hat puts a stake in the ground and offers what we believe will become THE certification for JEE spec-level programming. There is a growing vacuum of leadership in this space and we intend to fill it. RHCJD gives us a core credential upon which we will build and extend the JBoss certification program for developers.

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Tips and Tricks: JBoss Enterprise Application Development (JB225)

by Jim Rigsbee (Red Hat)

Converting a web project generated by the JBoss Developer Studio CDI Web Project wizard to a Maven project will give you the power of the Maven build system with its dependency management, build life cycles, and automated JEE packaging abilities. To covert a JBoss Developer Studio web project, follow these steps:

1. Right click on the project name in the Project Explorer tree and select Configure → Convert to Maven Project… In the wizard steps be sure to select WAR packaging.

2. Configure the Java SE 6 compiler plugin so that we can process annotations. Add this to pom.xml file:

<build>
  <plugins>
    <plugin>
      <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
        <configuration>
          <source>1.6</source>
            <target>1.6</target>
      </configuration>
    </plugin>
  </plugins>
</build>

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Enforcing Authentication and Authorization on a JAX-WS web service using Picketlink

by Kenny Peeples (Red Hat)

Introduction

The following article describes how to enforce authentication with SAML and authorization with XACML on a JAX-WS Web Service on JBoss Enterprise Application Platform with Picketlink. I combined several articles listed in the References section to make this one demonstration. The source code is on github.

Products
JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 5.2.0
Picketlink 2.0.1
JDK 1.7
JBoss Developer Studio 6

Note: Future updates will the latest versions of EAP/Picketlink/Fuse and moving the projects to maven.

Server Project
Contains the Web Service to take the assertion out of the wsse, validate it, verify authorization and process the request. The files contained in the project are the SAML2ServerHandler.java, WSTest.java, WSTestBean.java, jboss.xml, jbossxacml-config.xml,standard-jaxws-endpoint-config.xml,xacml-policy.xml,sts-config.properties,sts-roles.properties,sts-security-domain-jboss-beans.xml,sts-users.properties. All the XML is displayed to the console.

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Guest Post: Journey to RHCE and beyond

by Christian Stankowic

My interest in Linux started in 2005 at the age of 15 when I discovered Ubuntu Linux. After being upset about my slow and always virus-attacked computer, I decided to try out something completely new.

I never had Linux on my computer before and wanted to have a look at it. After some first trials with OpenSuSE I got into Ubuntu and made my first experiences with the open operating system.

After exclusively using Ubuntu for almost two years I had a look at several other distros, including Debian, CentOS and Fedora. To learn more about Linux I built my own private “lab” using old spare computers. All these computers ran Linux, so I started to learn about network services including Apache, DHCP and Samba.

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