Tips and Tricks: JBoss Enterprise Application Development (JB225)

by Jim Rigsbee (Red Hat)

Converting a web project generated by the JBoss Developer Studio CDI Web Project wizard to a Maven project will give you the power of the Maven build system with its dependency management, build life cycles, and automated JEE packaging abilities. To covert a JBoss Developer Studio web project, follow these steps:

1. Right click on the project name in the Project Explorer tree and select Configure → Convert to Maven Project… In the wizard steps be sure to select WAR packaging.

2. Configure the Java SE 6 compiler plugin so that we can process annotations. Add this to pom.xml file:

<build>
  <plugins>
    <plugin>
      <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
        <configuration>
          <source>1.6</source>
            <target>1.6</target>
      </configuration>
    </plugin>
  </plugins>
</build>

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Guest Post: Journey to RHCE and beyond

by Christian Stankowic

My interest in Linux started in 2005 at the age of 15 when I discovered Ubuntu Linux. After being upset about my slow and always virus-attacked computer, I decided to try out something completely new.

I never had Linux on my computer before and wanted to have a look at it. After some first trials with OpenSuSE I got into Ubuntu and made my first experiences with the open operating system.

After exclusively using Ubuntu for almost two years I had a look at several other distros, including Debian, CentOS and Fedora. To learn more about Linux I built my own private “lab” using old spare computers. All these computers ran Linux, so I started to learn about network services including Apache, DHCP and Samba.

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Producing a Red Hat Training Course, Part 2

by Wander Boessenkool (Red Hat)

In the previous part of this series we explored the tools used by the Red Hat Curriculum Team to develop training courses. In this post we will explore the process behind our course development.

Outline

The process we follow when creating a new course consists of a number of steps.

  • Course Focus/Objective
  • Learner Analysis
  • Task Analysis
  • Classroom Setup
  • Lab Development
  • Content Development
  • Lab QA
  • Editorial Work
  • Course Pilot
  • Post Pilot Fixes
  • General Availability

Continue reading “Producing a Red Hat Training Course, Part 2”

Introducing the Red Hat Innovation Center

by Justin Hayes (Red Hat)

Like many organizations, Red Hat Consulting constantly seeks ways to eliminate organizational inefficiencies in our business operations. These inefficiencies typically deal with how our consultants are trained on cutting edge technologies, how our sales force demonstrates product capabilities to our customers and prospects, and how our technical groups request operational environments (virtual machines, platforms, etc.)

To attack this problem, a team of architects and consultants set out to design, implement, and operationalize a system that will reduce these inefficiencies. This system is called the Red Hat Innovation Center (RHIC). Its vision is twofold:

1. To demonstrate Red Hat products’ features and capabilities through a solutions-oriented approach based on real world use cases.
2. To enable our consultants to quickly and efficiently learn our technologies by lowering the barriers to entry to internal training.

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Guest post: Preparing for Red Hat exams

by Kenneth Poliran

Below is the second in a series of posts by actual Red Hat Certified Professionals offering their preparation tips for taking Red Hat exams. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s and not necessarily those of Red Hat Training.

When I began with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), I started with zero knowledge. As a system administrator, I had been working mostly on other operating systems, but not on RHEL. I had been asked to set up a server for a client that wanted a Linux environment because of its stability and performance with clustered environments, so I quickly browsed for Red Hat courses for and enrolled in class. After completing the course, next came the heart-stopping RHCSA exam, but I wasn’t that worried since I felt prepared for that day.

My preparation/suggestions:

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Using the command-line interface of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.1

by Rob Locke (Red Hat)

One of the new features introduced in version 3.1 of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization is a command line interface (CLI) to connect to the manager. The CLI also contains a scripting system, which helps system administrators perform periodic maintenance or repetitive tasks on their virtualization environment.

Communication with the RHEV Manager is secured through the use of a certificate that needs to be downloaded from the manager:

$ wget http://rhevm.pod0.example.com/ca.crt

Connect to the RHEV Manager using the rhevm-shell command (referring to the downloaded certificate):

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Guest Post: Preparing for Red Hat exams

by Anderson Silva

Below is the first in a series of posts by actual Red Hat Certified Professionals offering their preparation tips for taking Red Hat exams. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s and not necessarily those of Red Hat Training.

I have been working for Red Hat for over 5 years, and throughout these years I have had the opportunity to take several Red Hat Training courses and earn a few certifications. These certifications include: Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHEL5, 2007), Red Hat Certified Architect (2010) and Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHEL6, 2012).

So, when I read that the good people at Red Hat Training were looking for some ‘How do you prepare’ for Red Hat training courses and exams, I thought I had something to offer.

Red Hat Training courses are usually set up in a small classroom environment with 4 days of lectures, Monday through Thursday, and the exam on Friday. Throughout the years, the amount of time the exam takes has changed a bit, but one can be sure to take up at least your entire morning on Friday.

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2013 Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year

The Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year Award is back, and it’s time for Red Hat Certified Professionals (RHCPs) to submit their stories.

Red Hat will again be honoring the hard work, expertise, and ingenuity of some of the world’s premier IT professionals through its annual contest. The 2013 version of this contest will be open to all Red Hat Certification credentials (RHCSA, RHCE, RHCVA, RHCSS, RHCDS, RHCA, JBCAA, JBCD, and Red Hat Certificates of Expertise).

To be considered for the 2013 RHCP of the Year contest, you must be a current Red Hat Certified Professional and complete the online form. You will be asked to provide a 500-words-or-fewer summary that details how you innovatively and creatively used your Red Hat Certified skills to enhance your IT environment, increase system performance, tightened system security, and/or otherwise deliver results for your organization. Red Hat will accept submissions now through March 8, 2013.

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