Producing a Red Hat Training Course, Part 2

by Wander Boessenkool (Red Hat)

In the previous part of this series we explored the tools used by the Red Hat Curriculum Team to develop training courses. In this post we will explore the process behind our course development.

Outline

The process we follow when creating a new course consists of a number of steps.

  • Course Focus/Objective
  • Learner Analysis
  • Task Analysis
  • Classroom Setup
  • Lab Development
  • Content Development
  • Lab QA
  • Editorial Work
  • Course Pilot
  • Post Pilot Fixes
  • General Availability

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Guest post: Preparing for Red Hat exams

by Kenneth Poliran

Below is the second in a series of posts by actual Red Hat Certified Professionals offering their preparation tips for taking Red Hat exams. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s and not necessarily those of Red Hat Training.

When I began with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), I started with zero knowledge. As a system administrator, I had been working mostly on other operating systems, but not on RHEL. I had been asked to set up a server for a client that wanted a Linux environment because of its stability and performance with clustered environments, so I quickly browsed for Red Hat courses for and enrolled in class. After completing the course, next came the heart-stopping RHCSA exam, but I wasn’t that worried since I felt prepared for that day.

My preparation/suggestions:

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Using the command-line interface of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.1

by Rob Locke (Red Hat)

One of the new features introduced in version 3.1 of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization is a command line interface (CLI) to connect to the manager. The CLI also contains a scripting system, which helps system administrators perform periodic maintenance or repetitive tasks on their virtualization environment.

Communication with the RHEV Manager is secured through the use of a certificate that needs to be downloaded from the manager:

$ wget http://rhevm.pod0.example.com/ca.crt

Connect to the RHEV Manager using the rhevm-shell command (referring to the downloaded certificate):

Continue reading “Using the command-line interface of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.1”

Guest Post: Preparing for Red Hat exams

by Anderson Silva

Below is the first in a series of posts by actual Red Hat Certified Professionals offering their preparation tips for taking Red Hat exams. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s and not necessarily those of Red Hat Training.

I have been working for Red Hat for over 5 years, and throughout these years I have had the opportunity to take several Red Hat Training courses and earn a few certifications. These certifications include: Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHEL5, 2007), Red Hat Certified Architect (2010) and Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHEL6, 2012).

So, when I read that the good people at Red Hat Training were looking for some ‘How do you prepare’ for Red Hat training courses and exams, I thought I had something to offer.

Red Hat Training courses are usually set up in a small classroom environment with 4 days of lectures, Monday through Thursday, and the exam on Friday. Throughout the years, the amount of time the exam takes has changed a bit, but one can be sure to take up at least your entire morning on Friday.

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2013 Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year

The Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year Award is back, and it’s time for Red Hat Certified Professionals (RHCPs) to submit their stories.

Red Hat will again be honoring the hard work, expertise, and ingenuity of some of the world’s premier IT professionals through its annual contest. The 2013 version of this contest will be open to all Red Hat Certification credentials (RHCSA, RHCE, RHCVA, RHCSS, RHCDS, RHCA, JBCAA, JBCD, and Red Hat Certificates of Expertise).

To be considered for the 2013 RHCP of the Year contest, you must be a current Red Hat Certified Professional and complete the online form. You will be asked to provide a 500-words-or-fewer summary that details how you innovatively and creatively used your Red Hat Certified skills to enhance your IT environment, increase system performance, tightened system security, and/or otherwise deliver results for your organization. Red Hat will accept submissions now through March 8, 2013.

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Producing a Red Hat Training Course – Part 1

by Wander Boessenkool (Red Hat)

Producing a Red Hat Training course takes a lot of hard, but also thankful, work. In this series of posts I will explore the workflow that goes into producing a single course.

To satisfy our technical readers we still start this series with a post about the tools we use to produce our output documents, from the slide-decks used by our instructors, through the PDF files sent to our printers to produce the printed version of our Instructor Guides and Student Workbooks, to the HTML content and stylesheets used for our Red Hat Online Learning offering.

Single Source Publishing

All of our course materials are authored in DocBook, an XML dialect designed for producing texts, ranging from a one page article all the way up to a set of multiple books. Using DocBook we can then easily convert a single set of source files describing a book into a wide range of output formats using XSL transforms.

Continue reading “Producing a Red Hat Training Course – Part 1”

Taste of Training Preview: EAP6 clustering over TCP

by Will Dinyes (Red Hat)

With the recent release of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 6, Red Hat is ensuring that developers and administrators alike are getting more for less. More performance, for less memory. More services, with less configuration. And more management tools, with less hassles. In conjunction, the Red Hat Training team has been hard at work integrating more into our JBoss courses. First, we updated our popular JBoss Application Administration I course (JB248). Now we are set to release our updated course JBoss Application Adminisration II (JB348). Available in December, JBoss Application Administration II will bring all of the advanced topics we covered in our similar course for EAP 5, such as clustering, performance tuning, and JBoss Operations Network, and will add even more content specific to EAP 6, covering CLI scripting, messaging providers, and an introduction to OpenShift.

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Business value of open source software

by Satish Irrinki (Red Hat)

It’s a truism that adopting open source software (OSS) reduces costs, but that’s not all. Let’s make a deeper dive into the business value of adopting OSS and uncover how the adoption provides immense value at multiple levels of an organization. The value proposition for OSS can be attributed to three groups within an organization – Technical Buyers, Business Buyers, and Economic Buyers.

Technical Buyers
Technical buyers can be best described as the line managers who are operating under stringent budgets to do more with fewer resources. As a result they aim to reduce costs and increase efficiencies within their operating units. In a bid to increase their resources utilizations, the technical buyers seek to increase reliability and flexibility in their operations. To achieve these goals they use systems that are reliable, adhere to standard specifications, and low in cost.

The high level of collaboration and contribution within the OSS development model accelerates the number of features that typical open source software provides. Availability of source code allows the adopters to make custom changes and tailor the software for specific needs. The ability to reuse software components across the organization (develop once and use within multiple systems) reduces the unit cost of development. These virtues of OSS mesh well with the goals of technical buyers and make OSS a viable option when making technology decisions.

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