Red Hat Training and certifications help build your path to the cloud

by Randy Russell and Pete Hnath (Red Hat)

Cloud computing represents a major shift in enterprise IT architecture that requires companies to rethink their strategy. Red Hat is bringing to market a full portfolio of training and certification offerings that enable customers to evaluate Red Hat’s cloud technologies and understand how to deploy them successfully.

Customers seeking to build an open Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud may look to Red Hat OpenStack as their foundation. OpenStack is emerging as a leading platform for IaaS cloud architectures and has attained broad industry support. Red Hat is excited to announce the immediate availability of Red Hat OpenStack Administration (CL210), which provides architects and system administrators with a hands-on course to learn how to install, configure, and manage a Red Hat OpenStack deployment. Later this summer Red Hat will also introduce the Red Hat certificate of expertise in OpenStack IaaS, which will validate a professional’s ability to successfully deploy and administrate an OpenStack based IaaS cloud.

For customers looking to deliver an open Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) cloud, OpenShift Enterprise by Red Hat may be the solution. OpenShift gives application developers self-service access so they can easily deploy applications on demand. Red Hat is pleased to announce the immediate availability of OpenShift Enterprise Administration (CL280), a heavily lab-based 2-day course that guides the student through the steps to install, configure and manage an OpenShift based PaaS cloud.

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Guest Post: My time as Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year

by Sean Millichamp

Sean Millichamp was crowned worldwide Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year in June 2012 at Red Hat Summit. With Rafael Guimaraes officially set to be the next recipient of the award at next week’s Summit event in Boston, Sean offers us a look back at his past 12 months since winning the esteemed title.

It’s been a little over a year now since Red Hat selected me as the 2012 Worldwide Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year and what a year it has been! The whole experience was (and continues to be) amazing.

Initially, I didn’t tell too many people when Red Hat notified me that I had won. As with any contest there is some requisite legal paperwork (permission to use your name, etc.) that has to be cleared and so I only told my family, my boss, and a couple of other co-workers who knew I had submitted an entry, but that didn’t last long. The news passed quickly from my boss, to the company VP, to the CEO and then to the entire executive and sales teams. I still had not announced it to my surrounding coworkers but when a fairly continuous stream of people began walking up to me to shake my hand I found myself repeatedly explaining to those around me why I was being congratulated and what the award was – all the while caught somewhere between my more typically modest self and extreme bubbling pride.

In fact, I think my employer, Secure-24, was every bit as excited about this award as I was. If this seems unusual you need only to understand our business. We are a managed hosting company: IT is our business. The majority of our employees are either technical or work to directly support technical resources. So, when a senior engineer on one of their main product platforms wins a top award with a key partner – it was a sales/marketing dream come true. Our marketing team even issued a press release about it!

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Guest Post: Preparing for Red Hat exams

By Damian Tommasino

Why Certify?

The demand for Linux engineers today is growing rapidly with the increase of “cloud” services. More and more organizations want their data to be available everywhere they go with zero downtime to their applications. This kind of demand from organizations requires that engineers know their “stuff” cold. When a web server goes down or a disk fails, you don’t have time to Google for an answer while there is a service outage affecting all of your customers. Becoming Red Hat certified is just one way to set yourself apart when showing potential, or current, employers that you can rise to the challenge.

Red Hat has clearly recognized these types of challenges that engineers and administrators face today when they developed their exams. Instead of the normal Q & A you would expect, these exams are fully hands-on. This lab style exam format helps to set Red Hat apart from other vendors by showing that certified individuals are highly experienced in their roles. For me, having Linux experience is critical to my job and being certified (from multiple vendors) shows expertise to my clients and peers.

Exam Format

The two main Red Hat exams are the Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) exam, and the Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) exam. As previously mentioned, each exam is completely hands-on and requires a solid proficiency of Red Hat Enterprise Linux in order to pass. The RHCSA is two and half (2.5) hours long, while the RHCE is two (2) hours.

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My thoughts on open source

by Bruno Lima

Long an acquaintance and ally of government institutions, open source is no longer considered rocket science by the enterprise.

Companies find open source attractive because they’re not tied to one vendor, can make improvements in the system at any time and realize cost savings, all helping boost market penetration. And, of course, there’s the benefit of communities continuously improving the products.

In the outside world, governments are strong sponsors of this type of initiative, especially in Brazil, where the use of free and open source software is encouraged to make the market more democratic. And, of course, the market has become increasingly more open to open source. While there were once concerns about the reliability, security, and functionality, those fears are all gone. Red Hat has made it possible to combine the benefits of these technologies with the necessary support for mission-critical environments, developing platforms and the specific demands organizations face.

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Tips and Tricks: JBoss Enterprise Application Development (JB225)

by Jim Rigsbee (Red Hat)

Converting a web project generated by the JBoss Developer Studio CDI Web Project wizard to a Maven project will give you the power of the Maven build system with its dependency management, build life cycles, and automated JEE packaging abilities. To covert a JBoss Developer Studio web project, follow these steps:

1. Right click on the project name in the Project Explorer tree and select Configure → Convert to Maven Project… In the wizard steps be sure to select WAR packaging.

2. Configure the Java SE 6 compiler plugin so that we can process annotations. Add this to pom.xml file:

<build>
  <plugins>
    <plugin>
      <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
        <configuration>
          <source>1.6</source>
            <target>1.6</target>
      </configuration>
    </plugin>
  </plugins>
</build>

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Guest Post: Journey to RHCE and beyond

by Christian Stankowic

My interest in Linux started in 2005 at the age of 15 when I discovered Ubuntu Linux. After being upset about my slow and always virus-attacked computer, I decided to try out something completely new.

I never had Linux on my computer before and wanted to have a look at it. After some first trials with OpenSuSE I got into Ubuntu and made my first experiences with the open operating system.

After exclusively using Ubuntu for almost two years I had a look at several other distros, including Debian, CentOS and Fedora. To learn more about Linux I built my own private “lab” using old spare computers. All these computers ran Linux, so I started to learn about network services including Apache, DHCP and Samba.

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Producing a Red Hat Training Course, Part 2

by Wander Boessenkool (Red Hat)

In the previous part of this series we explored the tools used by the Red Hat Curriculum Team to develop training courses. In this post we will explore the process behind our course development.

Outline

The process we follow when creating a new course consists of a number of steps.

  • Course Focus/Objective
  • Learner Analysis
  • Task Analysis
  • Classroom Setup
  • Lab Development
  • Content Development
  • Lab QA
  • Editorial Work
  • Course Pilot
  • Post Pilot Fixes
  • General Availability

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Guest post: Preparing for Red Hat exams

by Kenneth Poliran

Below is the second in a series of posts by actual Red Hat Certified Professionals offering their preparation tips for taking Red Hat exams. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s and not necessarily those of Red Hat Training.

When I began with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), I started with zero knowledge. As a system administrator, I had been working mostly on other operating systems, but not on RHEL. I had been asked to set up a server for a client that wanted a Linux environment because of its stability and performance with clustered environments, so I quickly browsed for Red Hat courses for and enrolled in class. After completing the course, next came the heart-stopping RHCSA exam, but I wasn’t that worried since I felt prepared for that day.

My preparation/suggestions:

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