OpenStack Training and Curriculum Overview (Part 3)

With the recent release of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 8, the Red Hat Training and Certification team sat down with Pete Hnath and Randy Russell to discuss new training curriculum available for OpenStack. Here are some highlights from that conversation.

This is the final post in a three-part series on OpenStack Training.

 

OpenStack Administration I (CL110)

Pete Hnath: This 5-day course is designed for IT professionals who have the same understanding of linux as an RHSCA does. In this course, we will introduce the more approachable tools of OpenStack, enable that professional to “stand up” a basic proof of concept of OpenStack.

We are taking an IT professional who has an RHSCA level understanding of linux and over the course of 5 days, use the more approachable tools in OpenStack, enable that pro and teach them to stand up a basic proof of concept.

Randy Russell: In that first course, we do an exceptional amount of context setting, architecture understanding. Because they are so many moving parts, we are giving broader context around the technology.

 

OpenStack Administration II (CL210)

Pete Hnath: To now take an IT professional that now has the core understanding of the core services and can do a basic install with tools like PackStack and Horizon, enable that person to now utilize OpenStack Director, stand that proof of concept, and be able to start to exercise the capabilities of a production deployment of what OpenStack might look like.

Real utility of OpenStack is to provide a business a platform for a ultimately a hybrid IaaS platform. Typically, this means that you are operating a high-degree of scale. You are not just deploying a server or even a cluster of servers to support an app, you are really talking deploying, very broadly, a platform that would support many, many, many apps across a variety of use cases. You are laying the next generation datacenter down.

 

Randy Russell: For our customers to have really utility/use of OpenStack, it needs to be manageable at scale and that is what OpenStack director is designed to do. And shines. Over the course of 4-days of CL210, we spend a lot time exploring director and how to do configuration management, automation, and how to operate at scale. In some cases, the actual task of what they do in CL110 and CL210 may be similar, but instead doing it with less scalable tools, you will now be using something that is really designed and optimized for scalability. And it prepares students for the EX210 or RHSCA in OpenStack.

 

OpenStack Administration III (CL310)

Pete Hnath: This course goes deeper into two key use cases around OpenStack: providing cloud storage using CEPH in complement with OpenStack and networking with Neutron. We took these two topics and aligned them together as the foundation for CL310. The first use case covers CEPH, and is far and away the leading cloud storage solution for OpenStack deployments. It is an obvious extension beyond CL210.

Randy Russell: And this class also prepares students for the RHCE in OpenStack, which, if an IT professional passes, certifies and proves that they have the skills and knowledge to integrate Red Hat OpenStack Platform services with Red Hat Ceph Storage and implement advanced networking features utilizing the OpenStack Neutron service.

 

See where your OpenStack skills stack up.

Want to take that next step? Enroll in Red Hat Learning Subscription & train online for 365 days.

Want to learn more about our OpenStack offerings? Visit our website.

 


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